As we act on what God speaks to us about, we change. As we change and those we pray for change, culture changes. Because WE ARE CULTURE.   Our vision           All rights reserved We R Culture 2016        Privacy/disclaimer
Thus far, our recent efforts to change Canadian culture have not been very successful. We need to ask ourselves:   Have we understood God’s plan? Have we skipped any steps steps? Have we been unwilling to take the actions necessary - to pay the personal cost? To solve social issues, we believe we can glean lessons by looking at history and seeing how God proceeded in the past. As an example: we have chosen to examine how slavery was halted in England, a process that took decades. Below is a time-line of England from 1700 AD - 1833 AD  The dates below are grouped to give a broad overview, illuminating the long term process God used to change England and stop slavery.                  
1730 AD Step 1     Passionate Prayer
1760 AD Step 2  Preaching and Social Justice
1780 AD   Step 3   Political Leadership
1800 AD - 1833 AD Step 4  Perseverance and Victory
The Master Architect: God’s steps for changing England.
Some of the methods used by the abolitionists
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1700 AD   Starting point, the moral state of England
England in moral decay:  Drunkenness was rampant. 1 Newborns were exposed in the streets. 1 As many as 25% of all single women in London were prostitutes.2 Some brothels advertised that they had no girls OLDER than 14. 2 Corruption and immorality were prevalent in the highest ranks, even in the royal family. 2  97% of the poor in the workhouses died as children. 1 Tickets were sold to public executions as to a theatre. 1 The slave trade brought material gain to many while further degrading their souls. 1 1 - (Christian History Institutes Glimpses, Issue #38) 2- David J. Vaughan, Statesman and Saint: The Principled Politics of William Wilberforce, p 59   Preaching anything but Christ: During this time, Sir William Blackstone (1723 - 1780) visited the church of every major clergyman in London. In his analysis of the sermons, he said it would have  been impossible to tell just from listening whether the preacher was a follower of Confucius, Mohammed, or Christ! 1  Question: Is there a correlation between the moral state of a country and what is preached from the pulpit? Preceding the abolition of slavery by approximately 100 years, the “first wave” of prayer was started by the Moravians in 1727, and it began a prayer focused on  salvations and missions, including social justice,  that lasted 100 years.  The Methodist revival of the 18th century in England, often called the “first great awakening” benefited from the Moravians who were ministering and praying in  London. Peter Böhler, the London Moravian leader, and his followers established the Fetter Lane Society in May 1738. They began with the purpose of meeting  once a week for prayer and fellowship, praying for each other and their new country. Their passion inspired many Christians including John and Charles Wesley.   The prayer that proceeded the “second awakening” started in the 176o’s and went to 1820’s. This prayer movement reignited the social and missional conscience of  both Britain and the United States. Though the prayer fervency appeared to have abated, the social conscience of the British and Americans ignited. Less than 10  years after the prayer began to wane, the United States anti slavery movement coalesced and the British people finally passed bills to free the slaves.  Patrick Johnstone explains that each of the “evangelical awakenings was preceded by passionate prayer, for God to rend the heavens and come down in power.  Each wave of awakenings advanced the Kingdom significantly around the world.”  The Future of the Global Church: History, Trends and Possibilities p135 John Wesley , Charles Wesley, George Whitefield. In a time and place in which many viewed poverty and sickness as an indicator of the worth of the individual, these men preached God’s love for all mankind and  demanding unrestricted love for one’s neighbour.   “We do not live a solitary existence as if in an individualistic bubble, but in a community called to social accountability. The sin we knowingly do contributes to  the burden of sin dispersed through the whole society.”2  Thus John Wesley preached thousands of sermons, not only to save sinners but also his culture and country from the ravages of sin.  These preachers and their followers: - Visited prisoners and worked for prison reform.  - Cared for children in poverty but worked for the passage of child labour laws and set up orphanages.    - Introduced interest-free loans for the poor in London. 1 - Devoted themselves to helping the poor to find jobs. - Fought for the abolition of slavery. In 1774, Wesley wrote “Thoughts upon Slavery”, declaring that slavery was offensive to God. 1 - Marquardt, Manfred. John Wesley’s Social Ethics. 1992. 2 -Oden, Tom. John Wesley’s Teachings Volume IV:  Ethics and Society William Wilberforce, at the age of 21, was elected to Parliament in 1784. In 1787 he headed the parliamentary campaign against the British slave trade. From  1789, Wilberforce regularly introduced bills in Parliament to ban the Slave Trade. He fought for twenty years, finally succeeding to see the passage of the Slave  Trade Act of 1807, which stopped the trading but not the owning of slaves. In the spring of 1833 Wilberforce wrote a last petition asking for the complete  abolition and freeing of slaves. On the 26th July, 1833, the Abolition of Slavery bill passed its third reading in the House of Commons.  Thomas Fowell Buxton was elected MP for Weymouth in 1818, a position he held until 1837. He was a strong advocate for the abolition of slavery in the British  Colonies. In 1823, he formed the Society for the Extinction of the Slave Trade, the committee that co-ordinated the campaign for total abolition. In 1824, he  succeeded William Wilberforce as head of the anti-slavery party in Parliament, continuing the struggle until the Slavery Abolition Act, in 1833, freed all enslaved  people in the British Empire.   William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, was Prime Minister at the time the 1807 Act to Abolish the Slave Trade was passed. He sincerely believed the Slave Trade to be "detestable".  Granville Sharp was a civil servant and political reformer. He was one of the 12 men who, in 1787, formed the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave  Trade and was the first chairman of the Society. He also used his skills to fight a series of legal battles to prevent enslaved people being taken out of England by  force. In 1807, the slave trade was finally abolished, but this did not free those who were already slaves. It was not until 1833 that an act was passed giving freedom to  all slaves in the British empire. Wilberforce persevered until he had completed the task, pushing on even with failing health. He died just three days after the  signing of the final bill that emancipated the slaves.  The new Act was not everything the campaigners wanted. Firstly, £20,000,000 compensation was paid to the slave owners (the amount today would be about  £1220 million). Secondly, slaves had to work as ‘apprentices'. (As apprentices, slaves had to work for their former masters for six years, with no pay). Only  children under six were given true freedom.   In 1838, a petition was presented to Parliament, protesting about the apprenticeship system and signed by 449,000 people. Parliament finally ended the  apprenticeship system on 1 August 1838.  Wilberforce's other efforts to 'renew society' included the organisation of the Society for the Suppression of Vice in 1802.  He worked with the reformer, Hannah More, in the Association for the Better Observance of Sunday. Its goal was to provide all children with regular education  in reading, personal hygiene and religion. He was closely involved with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. He was also instrumental in  encouraging Christian missionaries to go to India. The Quakers petitioned Parliament against the slave trade as early as 1783 and a similar petition was submitted in 1785, this time  from the inhabitants of Bridgewater in Somerset. These were piecemeal efforts, with a relatively small number of people.   It was the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, organised in May 1787, which set the movement on its modern course, making  it possible to mobilise thousands of Britons. Through their efforts two massive petitions were brought forward showing the vast  support of the British people for the abolition of slavery.  The use of strong imagery was instrumental in garnering support for the campaign as well as raising awareness of the conditions  faced by enslaved Africans. The 'Brookes print' designed by the Quaker, James Phillips – a diagram that depicted the horrendous  conditions that 454 enslaved Africans endured aboard the slave ship Brookes.   Another strategy adopted by local groups was the boycott. Abolitionists were encouraged to boycott sugar grown and refined using  slave labour in the plantations. It is estimated that by 1792, at least 400,000 people across Britain refused to eat sugar from the  plantations.
     As we act on what God speaks to us about, we change. As we change and those we pray for change, culture changes.                        Because WE ARE CULTURE.                  All rights reserved We R Culture 2016
Thus far, our recent efforts to change Canadian culture have not been very successful. We need to ask ourselves:   Have we understood God’s plan? Have we skipped any steps steps? Have we been unwilling to take the actions necessary  - to pay the personal cost? To solve social issues, we believe we can glean lessons by looking at history and seeing how God proceeded in the past. As an example: we have chosen to examine how slavery was halted in England, a process that took decades. Below is a time-line of England from 1700 AD - 1833 AD  The dates below are grouped to give a broad overview, illuminating the long term process God used to change England and stop slavery.                       1700 AD Starting point,                       the moral state of England
The Master Architect: God’s steps for changing England.
Site map
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